Links We Loved This Week — 11/3/17

This week under the heading of “blog post ideas I really wish I’d had first,” Lit Hub has a hilarious post called “Take a Literary World Tour Alongside Paul Manafort’s Dirty Money,” subtitled “An essential book from every country where Paul Manafort allegedly laundered his money.” Ha! I’ve been thinking of reading The Big Green Tent; maybe it’s finally time.

Did you know Lydia Davis and Siri Hustvedt have both been married to Paul Auster? We didn’t. Anyway, here’s an amazing interview with Hustvedt (who is still married to Auster) about the sexist assumption of confessional writing that dogs her but not her husband.

The reviews for Netflix’s competing Margaret Atwood adaptation, Alias Grace, have emerged, and they’re raves.

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Links We Loved This Week – 3/17/17

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

An amazing human on the internet wrote a hilarious in-depth study of the art collection of Mike and Carol Brady (at wearethemutants.com, found via Longreads). Favorite excerpt: “The wall space in the office vestibule suffered three different paintings in five years. This had a disorienting effect on the kids and may explain why Greg once abducted a goat.”

Margaret Atwood, whose Handmaid’s Tale is going to be on Hulu soon, penned an essay about the book’s sudden relevance to the events of today (via NYTimes).

Vulture writes of The Good Fight‘s strange dualities and inner contradictions. The article is full of clever and unexpected insights. The one thing I think they miss is the duality of the white privilege on the show–the white characters are forced to confront their privilege, yet they are only front-and-center on this show because of an inherently conservative TV structure where known quantities (more likely to be white) get top billing.

We can never resist a good long article on Rebecca Solnit, feminist hero, and inventor of mansplaining. (via Elle)

Links We Loved This Week — 9/2/16

Stylus writes about Echo and the Bunnymen‘s eerie–and apropos–“Villiers Terrace.”

EW‘s Fall Book Preview, including Zadie Smith’s Swing Time, Elena Ferrante’s “dark and eerie” tale of a doll abandoned on a beach, and Margaret Atwood’s comic about a part-bird, part-cat superhero.

Variety‘s list of most anticipated movies this Oscar season, including Chris Pratt and Jennifer Lawrence starrer Passengers, Derek Cianfrance’s Light Between Oceans–starring real-life couple Alicia Vikander and Michael Fassbender–and Denis Villeneuve’s Arrival.

Speaking of Arrival, it’s getting RAVE reviews out of Venice. Here’s our favorite, from The Playlist.

You’re the Worst came back this week! We’ll be posting coverage of the premiere shortly, but for now, here’s Stephen Falk on the characters’ unsuitability for parenthood and the “traumatic” romantic experiences of the writers.

[Saying “I love you” is] never a mutual thing, it’s always one person says it. But yeah, in the writer’s room, we tell a lot of personal stories, and I do remember, yes, a lot of stories of saying it and getting a “thanks” back, or something horrible like that. All the writers have a lot of romantic trauma in our past, so there’s a lot to mine in that room.

Did you think Kafka made up the hunger artist idea? I did, but Atlas Obscura revealed that this was actually a long-running obsession in Europe.