Topless Archie, with white tape around his hands and red satin shorts and blood all over his face, stands a little unsteadily in a boxing ring.

Riverdale Season 3, Episode 21 “The Dark Secret of Harvest House”

Previously on Riverdale: Archie came to the hospital to kill Hiram but didn’t; Veronica found out her dad had swindled her out of ownership of her properties; Veronica and Archie teamed up to take down Hiram; the Farm offered Alice, Toni, and Cheryl help when they were emotionally vulnerable; Edgar got engaged to Alice even though he was totally already married to his fake daughter Evelyn and was also probably banging Cheryl; Betty helped Evelyn to escape from the Sisters of Quiet Mercy; Jughead had some Theories about the G&G game; Ricky tricked Jellybean into playing G&G with him; the Black Hood escaped and almost killed Betty.

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The Great Dawson’s Creek Rewatch Project: Final Thoughts

By Nerdy Spice and Janes

[In 2018, we rewatched all of Dawson’s Creek. See our posts here.]

Nerdy Spice: I’m so sad to have finished up this rewatch. It was bringing me so much pure delight–often to the point of tears, and even when an episode was sort of stupid or even infuriating or angering. Living with Dawson, Joey, Pacey, Jen, and Jack day in and day out remains a pleasurable and even magical experience.

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Links We Loved This Week – 1/20/17

It may be 2017, but the internet, including us, is not done talking about the Gilmore Girls revival:

McSweeney’s published a hilarious rejection letter of Rory’s memoir.

The Millions has an essay on how Rory’s changes reflected the changed political mood of the new millennium. It’s quite brilliant, even though it woefully misquotes a scene, attributing one of Lorelai’s funniest lines to the undeserving Rory.

Meanwhile, elsewhere on the Internet:

The NYT wrote about the books that got Obama through the presidency. Among them are Colson Whitehead’s The Underground Railroad, which I liked a lot but perhaps didn’t love, and The Three-Body Problem, which Keets definitely loved.

In Bitch Magazine, there’s an insightful exploration of the vastness of Jane Eyre‘s influence on feminist and female literature.

Shelter in Place – Alexander Maksik

Joseph March, the hero of Alexander Maksik’s novel Shelter In Place, has two problems: tar, and a bird. The tar is the black, creeping heaviness of his depression, which comes along with periods of mania; the bird is the painful part, the part that pierces his chest. He has bipolar disorder (or rather has something unnamed that, with its cycles from up to down, resembles it), and he’s constantly haunted by his own, inexplicable, internal rhythms of pain and joy. Alexander Maksik has lit upon a perfect metaphor for severe depression.

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Links We Loved This Week — 12/3/16

This week in media, everyone has an opinion on Gilmore Girls! Here are a few of the best we’ve read, and stay tuned–we’ll be putting up a few opinions of our own here. There seems to be just one thing everyone can agree on: Fat-shaming sucks.

At Vox, Aja Romano makes a compelling argument that Stars Hollow, or maybe the show itself, is in the business of destroying women’s potential.

The Atlantic thinks Rory is a horrible journalist, and we have to agree.

At The New Yorker, Betsy Morais views Rory as a case of arrested development.

Duana at Lainey Gossip bucks the trend, arguing that Rory isn’t that bad.

At Vulture, Amy Sherman-Palladino explains why A Year in the Life ends just before the election: because they didn’t have the budget to show what happens when the actual devil takes over the world. Hee!

At Vanity Fair, Laura Bradley makes the argument that Emily is the real protagonist. I don’t know about that, but she is certainly a delight.

Amy Sherman-Palladino says in her first post-revival interview that Rory doesn’t have to go through with [SPOILER], although from context clues, that seems a little disingenuous.

Links We Loved This Week — 11/4/16

Watch Pixar’s adorable short about a baby sandpiper learning to find food: Piper.

The Beauty and the Beast pictures out on EW this week are ridiculously exciting for us.

At LA Review of Books‘ blog Avidly, there is a great piece on why Madame Merle is appealing to contemporary feminism. (To be clear, we are still Team Archer, all the way.)

The cast of Girls performed Emily Doe’s powerful essay about sexual assault in honor of her Woman of the Year award:

Links We Loved This Week — 10/28/16

It’s here!! A full trailer for Netflix’s Gilmore Girls Revival! At least two Adversion writers have shed actual tears watching it. The third isn’t disclosing.

Christopher Marlowe has officially been credited as a co-author on three of Shakespeare’s plays: all three parts of Henry VI. AKA the Shakespeare plays you never quite made it through.

The Walking Dead came back this week, and the resolution to the cliffhanger was almost as terrible as the cliffhanger itself. There are lots of scathing reviews circulating, but Vox calling it “terminally stupid television” sounds about right.

The Awl has a hilarious piece on creepy milk drinkers from popular culture, including good old Walter from Westworld.

Happy Halloween! Read Flavorwire’s collection of classic literature’s six uncanniest moments.